Published On: Fri, Sep 14th, 2018

Missouri mother stole her terminally ill daughter’s painkillers for opioid addiction

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Missouri mother stole her terminally ill daughter’s painkillers and took them herself to feed opioid addiction

  • Carol Ballweg, 46, stole oxycodone and fentanyl medication from her daughter 
  • Ballweg, from Missouri, admitted to having an opioid addiction to police 
  • Medical staff became worried after terminally ill daughter developed ‘bedsores’ 

A mother has been charged for stealing her terminally ill daughter’s painkillers and taking them herself.    

Carol Ballweg, 46, from Missouri, admitted to having an opioid addiction when police searched her home. 

Ballweg’s daughter, who was in hospice care, was prescribed fentanyl and oxycodone to cope with pain at the end of her life.

Carol Ballweg (pictured) 46, from Missouri, has been charged with stealing her terminally ill daughter's painkillers, oxycodone and fentanyl, and taking them for herself 

Carol Ballweg (pictured) 46, from Missouri, has been charged with stealing her terminally ill daughter’s painkillers, oxycodone and fentanyl, and taking them for herself 

But medical staff had become worried that Ballweg’s daughter was not being given the essential medicine. 

Throughout her daughter’s illness, Ballweg had asked repeatedly asked for refills for medication to be issued sooner than necessary, according to police.

Her daughter also had also developed painful bedsores and when doctors tested her urine no trace of the medication was found.

Ballweg, who was her daughter’s primary caregiver, admitted to police that she had been withholding the painkillers from her daughter so she could feed her addiction.

She has been charged with four felony counts of stealing a controlled substance and two misdemeanour counts of abusing an elderly, disabled or vulnerable person. 

Ballweg’s bond has been set at $100,000 cash and she has been instructed not to contact the victim. 

THE RISE OF FENTANYL: WHY IS SYNTHETIC DRUG SO DEADLY? 

Fentanyl was originally developed in Belgium in the 1950’s to aid cancer patients with their pain management. Given its extreme potency it has become popular amongst recreational drug users.

Between late 2013 and early 2015, over 700 deaths were attributed to fentanyl and related substances.

It is often added to heroin because it creates the same high as the drug – the effects are biologically identical – but at a much stronger potency.

Fentanyl is classified as a schedule II drug – indicating it has a strong potential to be abused and can create psychological and physical dependence. 

Other Schedule II drugs include Vicodin, cocaine, methamphetamine, Adderall, Ritalin and oxcodone.  

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