Published On: Fri, Sep 14th, 2018

Antoya Wilson: Full Story & Must-See Details

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Antoya Wilson is the latest African American to appear in the headlines after being mistreated by law enforcement. In a troubling video that surfaced online, Arizona Police can be seen grabbing Wilson and dragging her to the ground before forcibly administering a blood test.

The incident occurred after Wilson was pulled over and the police in Mesa, Arizona claimed they smelled marijuana in her car.

According to the YouTube description, Wilson refused a blood test after the DUI stop and suggested a swab/urine test, citing a fear of needles. However, the Mesa Police Department had other ideas. She was assaulted and forcibly had her blood drawn.

Mesa Police Officer Sandor Binkley was identified as one of the officers using excessive force in pulling Wilson from the chair she was seated in.

You can check out the troubling video below.

After Wilson was dragged to the ground, the camera turns in a different direction but you can continue to hear her screaming. The description of the video adds “during this altercation Officer Sandor Binkley punches the woman in the face repeatedly,” but the video does not clearly show that.

“Please don’t do this to me. I quit. God forgive y’all,” Wilson can be heard pleading. “I don’t like needles.”

The state of Arizona has an “implied consent” law which means you are required to take a blood, breath, or urine test if you are arrested for DUI. If you are lawfully arrested and the officer believes you are under the influence, then you are to be given a test within two hours.

However, there is a part of the law that states you can refuse, but not without a minor penalty. It states:

If you are arrested and you refuse the test, then the officer will require that you surrender your license and will file a report that will result in the state suspending your license or permit for at least twelve months (for a first offense). You may change your mind and face no consequence of your present refusal, but you need to tell the officer that you will now take the test. Failure to expressly agree to or complete the test will be treated as a refusal.

In most situations, if you refuse to take a mandatory blood, breath, or urine test, you cannot be forced to do so. However, the state may administer the test if you are unconscious or dead.

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